Samuel Fuller Film Screenings in July: The Big Red One and Falkenau, the Impossible

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Director Samuel Fuller (Emil Weiss)

Acclaimed Hollywood director Samuel Fuller is featured in the Museum’s current special gallery exhibit Filming the Camps: From Hollywood to Nuremberg—John Ford, Samuel Fuller, George Stevens. Fuller was born in Worcester, Massachusetts to Jewish parents in 1912. He later moved to New York City and became a crime reporter at the age of seventeen. Fuller joined the U.S. Army during World War II and was assigned to the 16th Infantry Regiment, First Infantry Division, nicknamed “The Big Red One” for the red “1” patch worn on the shoulder of the Division.

The First Infantry Division took part in the Allied invasion of North Africa and Sicily, and the unit stormed Omaha Beach on D-Day in 1944. In 1945, Fuller witnessed the liberation of Falkenau concentration camp, a subcamp of the Flossenbürg concentration camp. He was asked by his commanding officer to film the atrocities of the camp with his camera, a gift from Fuller’s mother. His footage became part of the French documentary Falkenau: the Impossible.

In July, the Dallas Holocaust Museum presents two film screenings that accompany the current special gallery exhibit Filming the Camps: From Hollywood to Nuremberg—John Ford, Samuel Fuller, George Stevens:

The Big Red One

Thursday, July 13, 2017 at 7 p.m.

Studio Movie Grill (Spring Valley and 75)

Free. RSVP through Eventbrite.

The Big Red One stars Lee Marvin and Mark Hamill as a sergeant and a soldier of the U.S. First Infantry Division, a group of GIs who witness the armed conflict in North Africa and Sicily, Omaha Beach, and Belgium. The unit liberated Falkenau concentration camp and saw the horrors of the Holocaust in Czechoslovakia. The film, based on Fuller’s personal experience during World War II, depicts his service in the First Infantry Division and the liberation the infamous concentration camp.

Falkenau, the Impossible

Sunday, July 16, 2017 at the Museum, 2 p.m.

Free. RSVP required through Eventbrite.

Emil Weiss’s 1988 documentary Falkenau, the Impossible features interviews with Fuller at the site of Falkenau concentration camp. The documentary also includes original footage shot by Fuller of the camp.

Filming the Camps is on view at the Museum now through August 3, 2017. The exhibition, curated by historian and film director Christian Delage, was designed, created, and distributed by the Mémorial de la Shoah (Paris, France), and made possible through the generous support of SNCF.

Community Partners: VideoFest, Dallas Jewish Film Festival, Denton Black Film Festival, 3 Stars Jewish Cinema

– Janet Montealvo Hitt, Marketing Coordinator, Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance

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